Tag Archive: extreme weather

Typhoon Ruby (Hagupit) Resources

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(Last Updated: April 24, 2015 22:09 EST)

This page was strictly dedicated to Typhoon Ruby resources.  The links are updated and organized by closest related subject.  Visit the GOVPH Official Gazette Page for Typhoon Ruby Updates.  Visit PAGASA-DOST for weather updates. The Philippine Red Cross (PRC) remains a vital resource; listen to their advice carefully.

 

Communications

Directory of Gov PH Social Media Accounts to Follow for Updates

Google’s Typhoon Ruby Map

Project AGOS Map

 

Updates and Effort

Comprehensive Matrix of Typhoon Ruby actions

Situation Reports (PDF)

* Situation Report 16 was not made available on website

Field Bulletins

 

Weather-Related

List of Multihazard Maps in the “Yolanda Corridor”

Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA-DOST)

PAGASA-DOST Mobile (Android) Downloads

 

Ruby Preparedness Measures Situation Reports Archive (PDF)

 

Quick Note on the use of #RubyPH

The Philippine Government and PRC have been using the #RubyPH on Twitter & other micro-blogging platforms for outreach, crisismapping and social media monitoring.  Please use the hash-tag appropriately, especially when residing (and using) internationally.

 

Explanatory

Online information for natural calamities

What does it mean if an area is under a state of calamity?

Make sense of PAGASA’s color-coding signals

Learn more about PAGASA’s public storm warning signals

Infographic: Mga paalala ukol sa storm surge

Infographic: Mga paalala ukol sa baha

 

See Something Missing? Let Me Know!

If you see a missing resource in this list please comment below, and I will be happy to add the information!  Always looking to add to the list of Typhoon Ruby resources if you want to contribute! (:

 

info4 Drought Quick links

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Drought
In general, drought is defined as an extended period – a season, a year, or several years – of deficient rainfall relative to the statistical multi-year average for a region. However, dozens of more specific drought definitions are used around the world that are defined according to the lack of rain over various time periods, or measured impacts such as reservoir levels or crop losses. Because of the various ways drought is measured, an objective drought definition has yet to be produced upon which everyone can agree[1].
Source: UNISDR
Characteristics
Drought can be defined according to meteorological, hydrological, and agricultural criteria[2].
– Meteorological.
Drought is usually based on long-term precipitation departures from normal, but there is no consensus regarding the threshold of the deficit or the minimum duration of the lack of precipitation that make a dry spell an official drought.
– Hydrological
Drought refers to deficiencies in surface and subsurface water supplies. It is measured as stream flow, and as lake, reservoir, and ground water levels.
– Agricultural
Drought occurs when there is insufficient soil moisture to meet the needs of a particular crop at a particular time. A deficit of rainfall over cropped areas during critical periods of the growth cycle can result in destroyed or underdeveloped crops with greatly depleted yields. Agricultural drought is typically evident after meteorological drought but before a hydrological drought.
Impacts/damages
Impacts are commonly referred to as direct or indirect. Reduced crop, rangeland, and forest productivity; increased fire hazard; reduced water levels; increased livestock and wildlife mortality rates; and damage to wildlife and fish habitat are a few examples of direct impacts. The consequences of these impacts illustrate indirect impacts. For example, a reduction in crop, rangeland, and forest productivity may result in reduced income for farmers and agribusiness, increased prices for food and timber, unemployment, reduced tax revenues because of reduced expenditures, increased crime, foreclosures on bank loans to farmers and businesses, migration, and disaster relief programs. Direct or primary impacts are usually biophysical. Conceptually speaking, the more removed the impact from the cause, the more complex the link to the cause. In fact, the web of impacts becomes so diffuse that it is very difficult to come up with financial estimates of damages. The impacts of drought can be categorized as economic, environmental, or social.
Many economic impacts occur in agriculture and related sectors, including forestry and fisheries, because of the reliance of these sectors on surface and subsurface water supplies. In addition to obvious losses in yields in crop and livestock production, drought is associated with increases in insect infestations, plant disease, and wind erosion. Droughts also bring increased problems with insects and diseases to forests and reduce growth. The incidence of forest and range fires increases substantially during extended droughts, which in turn places both human and wildlife populations at higher levels of risk[3].
See also an example of the effects of drought on the aquatic ecosystem in Australia and Colorado.
Emergency Action
In order to assess risk and respond to drought, a water supplier may wish to establish a local drought management team. Be sure to include people from all the relevant local water user groups on the team[4] (see more details on the link). A team may:
  • gather all the available drought information for your community,
  • identify information gaps,
  • target water management needs,
  • implement water conservation strategies,
  • provide support to local government in managing community water supplies, and
  • communicate with the public.
See also the action on responding to drought in pastoral areas of Ethiopia and the North Carolina emergency response plan.
Mitigation
The mitigation action identifies both the long and short term activities and actions that can be implemented to prevent and mitigate drought impacts. Such activities and actions are essential in the development of specific drought planning and response efforts. The operational component includes six aspects that need continuous feedback between them[5]:
  • Preparedness, early warning, monitoring systems.
  • Establishing priorities of water use.
  • Defining the conditions and the thresholds to declare drought levels.
  • Establishing the management objectives in each drought level.
  • Defining the actions.
  • Implementation of actions.
Monitoring and preparedness planning is the first essential step for moving from crisis to risk management in response to drought, and can be viewed as permanent measures to cope with drought events. The management actions related to agriculture and water supply systems are presented with a common conceptual framework based on the use of drought indices for evaluating the levels of drought risk (pre-alert, alert, and emergency), that allow linkages to be established between science (risk analysis) and policy (operational component).
See also drought mitigation policy in South Africa in Water Page and drought mitigation strategy for Bundelkhand region of Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh in India.
Further information
Several actions related to drought management plans:
1.    Drought contingency planning for pastoral livelihoods. (click here)
2.    Drought Contingency and Emergency Water Management Plan in Texas. (click here)
3.    Drought management guidelines in Mediterranean countries. (click here)
4.    Information about satellite observation and rainfall forecast to provide earlier warning of African drought by USGS.
 
 
above info4mation is from our friends at the UN

 

DROUGHT
USGS Water Use
UNL Drought Monitor
UNL Drought Monitor Current Conditions
National Drought Mitigation Center
USDA Drought Reports
USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service
NOAA’s Drought Info

 

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Dealing With Disasters

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[important]Dealing With Disasters[/important]

During disasters, it can be hard to know what to do, and how to deal with unimaginable tragedy, destruction and loss… this list has resources available on the Internet, for Adults, Adolescents, Children, with information on traumatic stress, stress in disasters, how to cope, how to talk to your family and children about a disaster.
Soon to be added, tips and resources to help pets, in field, international, and multilingual resources…

Red Cross: Searching for Family Members

During an emergency, letting your family know that you are safe can bring loved ones peace of mind. If you have a loved one in a disaster-affected area and are unable to contact them directly, please visit our Safe and Well service to see if your family member has registered. If no information is available, contact your local Red Cross chapter to request assistance.

Help for Military Families, Active Duty Service Members, Veterans

Find Your Local Red Cross Chapter by Zip Code

[important]Resources on the Web:[/important]

General & Adult Resources

Coping with Traumatic Stress Reactions -from VA Webpage

Fact Sheet on Stress- National Institute of Mental Health -Webpage, and PDF available
PTSD Meetup Groups- Search in your local area
Coping With Traumatic Events- SAMHSHA webpage   
Taking Care of You Coping Guidelines – From American Red Cross  
Red Cross Trauma & Emotional Support – all pdfs, all languages for download  
Trauma Information on Mental Health & Coping- Webpage 
Coping with Traumatic Stress 
Coping With Stress– CDC- Webpage

Adolescent & Children Resources for Parents

Helping Children Cope with Disaster (from FEMA)  
Helping Children and Adolescents Cope with Violence and Disasters: For Parents  (From National Institue of Health)
Where to Get Help for PTSD: General, Family, Military -National Center for PTSD
Helping Children Cope in Unsettling Times: Tips for Parents and Teachers– NASP
What Community Members Can Do: Helping Children and Adolescents Cope with Violence and Disasters- National Institute of Mental Health -Webpage, and PDF available

[important]National Help Hotlines For USA[/important]

Disaster Distress Helpline

“Feeling stressed? If you or someone you know has been affected by a disaster and needs immediate assistance, please call this toll-free number for information, support, and counseling. You will be connected to the nearest crisis center.”

1-800-985-5990 or
Text TalkWithUs to 66746

TTY for Deaf/Hearing Impaired:
1-800-846-8517

Also you can call:

Samariteens Emotional Support Hotline (For Teens)    800-252-8336

Samaritans Emotional Grief Support & Suicidal Hotline

877-870-4673

24 hours a day: 617-247-0220 and 508-875 4500

Other Resources:

Ready.gov on Recovering from Disasters:

Recovering from a disaster is usually a gradual process. Safety is a primary issue, as are mental and physical well-being. If assistance is available, knowing how to access it makes the process faster and less stressful. This section offers some general advice on steps to take after disaster strikes in order to begin getting your home, your community and your life back to normal.

 

[pullquote align=”left|center|right” textalign=”left|center|right” width=”30%”]This originally started as a spreadsheet and I wanted to make the list more publicly available in wake of the Boston Marathon Bombings, and more recently, the Texas and Oklahoma Tornadoes this month… Tragedies and disasters can be stressful and anxiety provoking. We are all human, we are all breakable. If you need help, don’t be afraid to ask for it, seek it out!

(Kelli Merritz) [/pullquote]

May 18, 2013 Oklahoma Tornadoes Resources

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FEMA: Oklahoma Severe Storms and Tornadoes (DR-4117) Disaster Declaration

Disaster Recovery Center Locator

Current Real Time Weather Alerts For OK (from KOCO Weather)

From the Oklahoma Attorney General’s Office:

Investigators with the Oklahoma Attorney General’s Office are investigating instances of price gouging and ask that anyone who experiences price gouging to contact the AG’s Office immediately on the fraud hotline at (405) 521-2029. The practice is illegal.
Also, the first scams typically seen following such tragic situations is charity fraud. Please stay alert and only donate to reputable charities.

[important] Help for Military Families, Active Duty Service Members, Veterans

Resources for Native Americans:

The Oklahoma Indian Missionary Conference Disaster Relief Team, whose mission is to provide direct support, care, and assistance to American Indian victims of disasters, is serving as a focal point to coordinate Native relief efforts. Rev. David Wilson, Choctaw, head of the OIMC Disaster Relief Team, has provided a telephone number for people who need help or who want to provide assistance; the team can be reached directly at 405.632.2006.

Resources for dentists, physicians, and veterinarians:

Henry Schein, Inc. (NASDAQ: HSIC), the world’s largest provider of health care products and services to office-based dental, medical and animal health practitioners, today announced that it has opened the Henry

Schein Disaster Relief Hotline for dentists, physicians, and veterinarians who experience operational, logistical, or financial issues as a result of the devastating tornado in Oklahoma. The toll-free number for all Henry Schein customers – 800-999-9729 – is operational from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. ET.

“We are all so deeply saddened by the devastating tornado that has struck the Oklahoma City region,” said Stanley Bergman, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of Henry Schein, Inc.  “When this kind of natural disaster occurs, it is imperative that we do all we can to help those impacted by such a tragedy. We encourage practitioners to call our hotline, so that we can assist in their recovery as quickly as possible.”

[/important]

Wireless Carriers:

Sprint and AT&T have said they are waiving voice, data and text overage charges through June 30 for customers in the affected areas of the May 18, 2013 Tornadoes

[/important]
How to Help Tornado Victims (from newsok.com)
Federal Assistance Information – Press Release from Governor Mary Fallin
The City of Moore Recovers Website
OKStrong Website
Sign up to receive weather alerts by email and phone from OK Office of Emergency Management

Resources From Oklahoma OEM; Helpful Links-

National Weather Service

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)

Interactive Weather Information Network

Oklahoma Emergency Management Association

Oklahoma Water Resource Board

Central Plains Visible Satellite

Doppler Radar Sites

Oklahoma Red Flag Fire Alert

Oklahoma’s Official Website

Additional Resources

Local Emergency Contacts

National Resources

Oklahoma Resources

Oklahoma Weather

Oklahoma Emergency Manager Directory

[feed url=”http://www.fema.gov/data/news.rss” limit=”7″]

 [notice]Updated as of 1100 CDT 5/23/13 [/notice]

 

Tropical Storm Mahasen (Retired)

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[important]Because Tropical Storm Mahasen has dissipated, this page is retired and will no longer provide updates. Any further related events will be reported separately from this report to avoid confusion.[/important]

 

[notice]Listed Below are Prior Updates[/notice]

 

On Friday 17 May, 2013:

[important]Cautionary Reminder[/important]

There is still a cautionary reminder to those still in the path of the remnants of Tropical Storm Mahasen.

 A Met office bulletin said under the influence of Mahasen, heavy to very heavy showers might occur at most places in southern Assam, Mizoram, Manipur, Tripura and Nagaland during the next 36 hours. (via Al Jazeera)

General Updates

Cyclone Mahasen weakened to a Tropical Storm before making landfall (late on the 16th) in Bangladesh.  With Bangladesh, India, Myanmar taking an active preparedness stance by evacuating hundreds of thousand of citizens from low-lying coastal areas and raising alert levels, when the Tropical Storm Mahasen arrived, what would have been a high number of deaths, is appearing to be in the single or double digit range.

“The storm was weaker than expected, but we have to commend the preparedness work done by the governments of Bangladesh and Myanmar and their partners to get people to safety and ensure that communities were ready,”  -Brian Kelly, IOM’s Asia-Pacific Emergency Advisor. (via Reliefweb)

There has been a lull in reports, and, as of yet, no official reports have been released indicating the cumulative amount of damage that Tropical Storm Mahasen has caused the affected areas, the numbers displaced (besides rough estimates), or the official cumulative death toll.

“The situation is turning normal and the people have started returning home after some 200,000 people took overnight refuge at cyclone shelters at Barisal Division,” divisional commissioner of Barisal Mohammad Nurul Amin told Bangladesh Sangbad Sangstha (BSS).

Useful Links

Media Coverage

 

On Thursday 16 May, 2013

Courtesy of BBC: Cyclone Mahasen is estimated to reach Bangladesh on Thursday 16 May, 2013 hitting coast by Chittagong and Cox’s Bazar. Burma is also threatened and evacuation efforts are underway to move tens of thousands of Rohingya Muslims living in camps around Sittwe in the state of Rakhine.

 

Click on the image above to be directed to original, larger picture.

 

info4 Quick Links – Heat & Cold

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[notification type=”alert-info” close=”false” ]Heat & Drought / Cold & Winter Storms[/notification]

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Extreme Temperature
Changes in temperature extremes tend to follow mean temperature changes in many parts of the world. IPCC indicate that cold extreme cold extremes warm faster than warm extremes by about 30% – 40% globally averaged (Andreas Strerl et al, 2008). Many areas of society are susceptible to the effects of extreme temperatures. Unusually high summer temperatures raise power demand for air conditioning, increase heat stress on crops, and may create dangerous conditions for human health. Low winter temperatures may cause damaging frosts and freezes, increase heating demands, and may disrupt transportation (Henderson et al, 1997).
Although they happen more slowly and are more difficult to see than a tornado or an earthquake, “heat waves” and “cold snaps” are deadly natural hazards. Extreme heat and cold occur somewhere in the world every year and can afflict nearly every location on Earth. Heat waves are periods of unusually high temperatures, usually lasting three days to three weeks. Typically, heat waves are characterized by temperatures of 35°C (95°F) or higher, although lower temperatures accompanied by high humidity levels can also be considered a heat wave. Cold snaps are commonly three days to three weeks in duration, with temperatures usually falling below -15°C (5°F).
Temperature extremes are most common in the mid-latitude regions, especially near the interior of large continents, such as North America. Here, without the moderating effects of the oceans, winter minimum temperatures can drop below -20°C (-4°F) and above 40°C (104°F) for several weeks. In the mid-latitude regions, temperature extremes are most common June through August, and December through February. In Polar Regions and the higher mid-latitudes, extreme low temperatures can occur anytime between late fall and early spring. In the lower mid-latitudes, extreme high temperatures are common from late spring through early fall. Much like high latitudes, high altitudes are frequently subject to extreme low temperatures. In alpine areas, which are typically above 3500 m (11,500 ft) depending on latitude, extreme low temperatures can occur for nine months or more during a year[1].

1.    Heat Wave

Heat wave or extreme heat is the temperatures that hover 10 degrees or more above the average high temperature for the region and last for several weeks are defined as extreme heat. Humid or muggy conditions, which add to the discomfort of high temperatures, occur when a “dome” of high atmospheric pressure traps hazy, damp air near the ground. Excessively dry and hot conditions can provoke dust storms and low visibility. Droughts occur when a long period passes without substantial rainfall. A heat wave combined with a drought is a very dangerous situation[2].
Source: WMO
A basic definition of a heat wave implies that it is an extended period of unusually high atmosphere-related heat stress, which causes temporary modifications in lifestyle and which may have adverse health consequences for the affected population. Thus, although a heat wave is a meteorological event, it cannot be assessed without reference to human impacts[3].
Impacts/damages
People living in urban areas may be at greater risk from the effects of a prolonged heat wave than people living in rural regions[4]. Heat wave impacts are widespread. While a large number of deaths may not occur in a single city every year, the cumulative impacts across broad regions over several days to weeks can result in heavy loss of life. Many more hundreds of deaths are associated with excessive heat attributed to heart attack, stroke, and also respiratory stress. Most deaths occur in urban areas where concrete, asphalt, and physical structures raise temperatures in urban heat islands, and nighttime temperatures remain above average. Heat waves also impact farming and ranching through loss of cattle and other livestock. Below are several impacts caused by heat waves[5]:
  1. Illnesses caused by exposure to high temperatures include heat cramps, fainting, heat exhaustion, heatstroke, and death.
  2. Population at increased risk especially older and younger people, risk of dehydration, low fitness/excessive exertion, etc.
  3. Another reason of death during heat wave is because of living alone. Studies designed to investigate why some people died during the 1995 and 1999 heat waves in Chicago found that the strongest risk factor was living alone, particularly for those who did not leave home daily.
Learn also about the impacts of the heat wave during the summer 2003 in Europe and the social impacts of heat waves in England.
Emergency Action
What you should do if the weather is extremely hot[6]:
  • Stay indoors as much as possible and limit exposure to the sun.
  • Stay on the lowest floor out of the sunshine if air conditioning is not available.
  • Consider spending the warmest part of the day in public buildings such as libraries, schools, movie theaters, shopping malls, and other community facilities. Circulating air can cool the body by increasing the perspiration rate of evaporation.
  • Eat well-balanced, light, and regular meals. Avoid using salt tablets unless directed to do so by a physician.
  • Drink plenty of water. Persons who have epilepsy or heart, kidney, or liver disease; are on fluid-restricted diets; or have a problem with fluid retention should consult a doctor before increasing liquid intake.
  • Limit intake of alcoholic beverages.
  • Dress in loose-fitting, lightweight, and light-colored clothes that cover as much skin as possible.
  • Protect face and head by wearing a wide-brimmed hat.
  • Check on family, friends, and neighbors who do not have air conditioning and who spend much of their time alone.
  • Never leave children or pets alone in closed vehicles.
  • Avoid strenuous work during the warmest part of the day. Use a buddy system when working in extreme heat, and take frequent breaks.
Learn also the emergency response on extreme heat in CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) or learn through community response.
Mitigation
Learn about heat wave mitigation using GIS and an action from National Disaster Education Coalition (NDEC).

2.    Cold Wave


A cold wave is a weather phenomenon that is distinguished by marked cooling of the air, or the invasion of very cold air, over a large area. It can also be prolonged period of excessively cold weather, which may be accompanied by high winds that cause excessive wind chills, leading to weather that seems even colder than it is. Cold waves can be preceded or accompanied by significant winter weather events, such as blizzards or ice storms. Other names of a cold wave include cold snap and deep freeze[7].
Impacts/damages
Some impacts of cold wave[8]:
  • Sudden cold waves can have detrimental effects on human beings. A cold wave that is unexpected can cause frost bites, hypothermia or other serious medical aliments.
  • A lot of damage is caused to animals and wildlife. When a cold wave comes along with heavy and incessant snowfall, animals may not be able to graze and thus die out of starvation. In order to feed livestock, farmers have to pay high prices for buying their food.
  • There can be cases of damage when water pipelines freeze and burst.
  • There is a rise in the demand for fuels and electricity.
See also the effects of cold wave on agricultural in India from 2002-2003 and also news about the effects of cold wave in Peru.
Emergency Action
Emergency response guidelines on cold wave[9]:
  • Stay indoors as much as possible.
  • Listen to the radio or television for weather reports and emergency information.
  • Conserve fuel, if necessary, by temporarily closing off heat to some rooms.
  • Eat to supply heat to the body and drink non-alcoholic beverages to avoid dehydration.
  • Wear several layers of loose fitting, lightweight; warm clothing rather than one layer of heavy clothing. The outer garments should be tightly woven and water repellent.
  • Carry a “basic vehicle emergency kit” in the trunk of your vehicle.
Mitigation
Extreme temperatures cannot be forecasted on a long-term basis and cannot be directly mitigated. They can however be managed by proper disaster plans that regulate authorities and emergency facilities in case of a heat or cold wave[10].
International weather forecasts are the main source of information. For this purpose, consult for example:
Regional and National weather service give more precise forecasts and weather information. Below are some examples:
Above info4mation is from our friends at the UN

 

Special Features

NOAA

HEAT
NOAA Climate Prediction Center Excessive Heat
Wind Chill and Heat Index

 

WIND CHILL

Tables of Wind Chill and Heat Index

 

WINTER STORMS

FEMA Winter Storms Factsheet

FEMA Winter Storm Update Center
NOAA News Online

 

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