Category Archive: Tropical Storm

Super Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan)

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[important](Author’s Note:  There is an updated post on Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) written 15 November, 2013. Please visit http://info4disasters.org/yolanda-update-resources/ and be informed of the most recent and up-to-date information.  Thank you!)[/important]

Typhoon Yolonda Gallery:

 

Super Typhoon Yolandai (internationally known as Haiyan), thought to be the largest typhoon of this year’s season, measures 600km in diameter, and at 4:40AM Philippine Standard Time, Yolanda made landfall over Guiuan, Eastern Samar.ii  PAGASAiii predicts that on Saturday morning, Typhoon Yolanda is expected to be 240km West Northwest of Coron, Palaan. It will be Saturday evening before Yolanda will be outside of PARiv. Maximum sustained winds are predicted to reach 235kph near the centre and have gusts up to 275kph, accompanied by an average of 10.0 – 30.0mm per hour within the 600 km diameter of the Super Typhoon.v

 

[quote style=”1″]”YOLANDA”, after hitting Guiuan ( Eastern Samar), is expected to traverse the provinces of Biliran, the Northern tip of Cebu, Iloilo, Capiz, Aklan, Romblon, Semirara Island, the Southern part of Mindoro then Busuanga and will exit the Philippine landmass (on Saturday early morning) towards the West Philippine Sea. Estimated rainfall amount is from 10.0 – 30.0 mm per hour (Heavy – Intense) within the 400 km diameter of the Typhoon. Sea travel is risky over the seaboards of Northern Luzon and over the eastern seaboard of Central

Luzon. Residents in low lying and mountainous areas under signal #4, #3 and #2 are alerted against possible flashfloods and landslides. Likewise, those living in coastal areas under signal #4, #3 and #2 are alerted against storm surges which may reach up to 7-meter wave height. The public and the disaster risk reduction and management council concerned are advised to take appropriate actions and watch for the next bulletin to be issued at 11 AM today. [/quote]

 PAGASA and JTWC Updates

PAGASA has issued images showing the predicted path of Yolanda. PAGASA has also provided hourly updates, bulletins, and warnings that can be accessed by visiting http://www.pagasa.dost.gov.ph/wb/tcupdate.shtml. The JTWCvi has also issued images of predicted path, satellite composites, and enhanced imagery. JTWC’s updates, forecast discussions, and warnings can be found at http://www.usno.navy.mil/JTWC/.

 PAGASA Signals

There are warnings. also known as signals that given to the public from PAGASA.  These warnings, or signals, are called Philippine Public Storm Warning Signals, and abbreviated as PSWS.vii  PSWS range from low to high intensity, as well as anticipated to sudden impact; the lowest of the warning signals is #1, and the highest of the signals is #4.viii To understand more about what each signal specifically means, visit http://www.pagasa.dost.gov.ph/genmet/psws.html#psws3. The current PSWS issued for the Philippines concerning Typhoon Yolanda can be accessed at http://www.pagasa.dost.gov.ph/wb/tcupdate.shtml or http://www.gov.ph/crisis-response/updates-typhoon-yolanda/.

 IFRC, Philippine Red Cross & Community Chapters

The Philippine Red Cross has been encouraging preparedness for Yolanda through social media accounts, community outreach, and through their web page. Their Chapters have been briefed and are now staged in their respective communities across the Philippines prepared to offer aid, and basic essentials. They issued their PRC Preparedness and Response Plan Re: Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) yesterday, giving a broad look at the measures they have taken to help. For more information and updates on what the Philippine Red Cross is currently doing you can visit their website at http://www.redcross.org.ph/, find them on Facebook, follow them on Twitter, or subscribe to their You Tube Channel. The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies issued an information bulletin on 7 November, 2013.

Earlier on Thursday, 7 November, the IFRC participated in a Humanitarian Country Team (HCT) and cluster leads meeting on the preparedness for response to Typhoon Haiyan. The IFRC Country Representative and the global shelter cluster regional focal point for Asia Pacific– who is in the Philippines since 18 October 2013 supporting an ongoing activation relating to the Central Visayas earthquake– participated. In preparation, the emergency shelter cluster has placed a team on standby to join rapid multi-sector assessment teams that are likely to be deployed in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan.

Meanwhile, on Thursday afternoon, 7 November, the PRC and Red Cross Red Crescent Movement partners with presence in the Philippines – Australian Red Cross, Finnish Red Cross, German Red Cross, the International Committee of the Red Cross, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, the Netherlands Red Cross and Spanish Red Cross – will have a meeting to define how they will best support the PRC in responding to potential humanitarian needs that will be wrought by the typhoon. In due course, partners will be updated on how the Movement components will coordinate possible interventions. —excerpt from IFRC Information Bulletin

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Official Resources

Other Important Resources:

Government Yolanda Updates (Updated Regularly)

Philippine Red Cross Survival Tips

Update: Typhoon Yolanda highest predicted storm surge and tide

List of municipalities expected to be affected by 40-60 mm 3-hour accumulated rainfall

List of municipalities expected to be affected by 60-100 mm 3-hour accumulated rainfall

List of barangays with alluvial fans

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 Warning to the Public

dotc_secretary_jabayaThe Department of Transportation and Communications (DOTC) warns the public of individuals attempting to solicit favours using the name of DOTC Secretary Joseph Emilio “Jun” Aguinaldo Abaya or representative/s of the Secretary or any of the Department’s officials. The DOTC advises the public to report any such request/s for favours/ transactions by the said individuals to the Office of the Secretary at Tel.Nos.724-6465/ 723-4698 or the Office of the Administrative Service Director at Tel. No.721-0800.

 

[spoiler title=”Spoiler title” open=”0″ style=”1″][tweets username=”dost_pagasa” limit=”3″ style=”1″ show_time=”1″] [tweets username=”NDRRMC_OpCen” limit=”3″ style=”1″ show_time=”1″] [tweets username=”philredcross” limit=”3″ style=”1″ show_time=”1″] [tweets username=”govph” limit=”3″ style=”1″ show_time=”1″] [tweets username=”DOTCPhilippines” limit=”3″ style=”1″ show_time=”1″] [tweets username=”MMDA” limit=”3″ style=”1″ show_time=”1″][/spoiler]

 

Footnotes:

i Haiyan was locally named Yolanda after entering the Philippine area of responsibility.

ii As reported by the most recent update bulletins issued at 11PM local time on Thursday by the PAGASA.

iii PAGASA stands for the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration

iv PAR is the acronym for the Philippine Area of Responsibility, and Yolanda is predicted to be outside of PAR Saturday evening, when she is 934 km West Northwest of Coron, Palawan as stated by PAGASA.

v Refer to PAGASA weather bulletin: http://www.pagasa.dost.gov.ph/wb/tcupdate.shtml

vi JTWC is the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, hosted and maintained by the United States Navy.

vii PSWS represents the Philippine Public Storm Warning Signals

Tropical Storm Mahasen (Retired)

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[important]Because Tropical Storm Mahasen has dissipated, this page is retired and will no longer provide updates. Any further related events will be reported separately from this report to avoid confusion.[/important]

 

[notice]Listed Below are Prior Updates[/notice]

 

On Friday 17 May, 2013:

[important]Cautionary Reminder[/important]

There is still a cautionary reminder to those still in the path of the remnants of Tropical Storm Mahasen.

 A Met office bulletin said under the influence of Mahasen, heavy to very heavy showers might occur at most places in southern Assam, Mizoram, Manipur, Tripura and Nagaland during the next 36 hours. (via Al Jazeera)

General Updates

Cyclone Mahasen weakened to a Tropical Storm before making landfall (late on the 16th) in Bangladesh.  With Bangladesh, India, Myanmar taking an active preparedness stance by evacuating hundreds of thousand of citizens from low-lying coastal areas and raising alert levels, when the Tropical Storm Mahasen arrived, what would have been a high number of deaths, is appearing to be in the single or double digit range.

“The storm was weaker than expected, but we have to commend the preparedness work done by the governments of Bangladesh and Myanmar and their partners to get people to safety and ensure that communities were ready,”  -Brian Kelly, IOM’s Asia-Pacific Emergency Advisor. (via Reliefweb)

There has been a lull in reports, and, as of yet, no official reports have been released indicating the cumulative amount of damage that Tropical Storm Mahasen has caused the affected areas, the numbers displaced (besides rough estimates), or the official cumulative death toll.

“The situation is turning normal and the people have started returning home after some 200,000 people took overnight refuge at cyclone shelters at Barisal Division,” divisional commissioner of Barisal Mohammad Nurul Amin told Bangladesh Sangbad Sangstha (BSS).

Useful Links

Media Coverage

 

On Thursday 16 May, 2013

Courtesy of BBC: Cyclone Mahasen is estimated to reach Bangladesh on Thursday 16 May, 2013 hitting coast by Chittagong and Cox’s Bazar. Burma is also threatened and evacuation efforts are underway to move tens of thousands of Rohingya Muslims living in camps around Sittwe in the state of Rakhine.

 

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