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Name: Donna Weber
Date registered: March 15, 2012

Latest posts

  1. Info4 Ebola — October 29, 2014
  2. Chile Earthquake and Tsunami 4-1-2014 — April 2, 2014
  3. Nairobi Information Quick Links — September 22, 2013
  4. Relief Web updates — August 14, 2013
  5. What is it like fasting in the heatwave? — July 18, 2013

Most commented posts

  1. info4 Earthquakes Quick Links — 1 comment
  2. info4 Quick Links – Heat & Cold — 1 comment
  3. info4 Tsunami Quick Links — 1 comment

Author's posts listings

Info4 Ebola

UNMEER – Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) Outbreak
(28 October 2014)

Dear Colleagues and Partners,

Below please find links to the latest products from UNMEER and OCHA on the Ebola Outbreak :

  1. Situation Report :
    UNMEER Weekly Situational Analysis : http://goo.gl/RQdcNy
  2. Cases Map :
    Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) Outbreak : http://goo.gl/bRNyNV
  3. 3W :
    Guinea : http://goo.gl/bls2QI
    Liberia : http://goo.gl/IvpBT5
    Sierra Leone : http://goo.gl/OpNMIR
  4. Fact Sheets :
    Guinea : http://goo.gl/nTrxcI
    Liberia : http://goo.gl/uxufCn
    Sierra Leone : http://goo.gl/YfPD7M
  5. Contacts List :
    Guinea

    Liberia

    Sierra Leone

For more information please visit the Regional Ebola Crisis web page on the Humanitarian Response platform at http://bit.ly/1oRJwI1 or the Humanitarian Kiosk App which is updated on a daily basis.

Regards,
UNMEER

Chile Earthquake and Tsunami 4-1-2014

Number of Deaths: 6 person(s)
Number of Injured: 3 person(s)
Number of Evacuated: 900000 person(s)

Situation: Chile has declared two northern regions hit by a 8.2 magnitude earthquake to be disaster areas. At least six people are known to have died and tens of thousands of people have been evacuated. The quake struck at 20:46 local time (23:46 GMT) about 86km (52 miles) north-west of the mining area of Iquique, the US Geological Survey said. Waves of up to 2.1m (6ft) have hit some areas and there have been power cuts, fires and landslides. Tens of aftershocks have been reported throughout the night, including a 6.2 tremor. The government said the declaration of a disaster in the regions of Tarapaca, Arica and Parinacota was aimed at “avoiding instances of looting and disorder”. President Michelle Bachelet said the country had “faced the emergency well” and called on those in affected regions “to keep calm and follow instructions from the authorities”. She is due to visit the affected areas later on Wednesday. Chilean TV broadcast pictures of traffic jams as people tried to head for safer areas. Officials said the dead included people who were crushed by collapsing walls or died of heart attacks. The interior minister also told Chilean TV that some 300 women inmates had escaped from a prison in Iquique. Officials later said that 26 of them had been recaptured. Authorities say they have re-established electricity supply in 50% of the affected areas. Iquique Governor Gonzalo Prieto told local media that in addition to those killed, several people had been seriously injured. While the government said it had no reports of significant damage to coastal areas, a number of homes were reported destroyed in Arica.rnrnFurther damage may not be known until dawn. The quake shook modern buildings in Peru and in Bolivia’s high altitude capital of La Paz – more than 470km (290 miles) from Iquique. The Chilean interior ministry told the BBC that one of the main roads outside Iquique was cut off because of hillside debris. Partial landslides have also taken place between the towns of Putre and General Lagos. The authorities are reported to have deployed a planeload of special forces to guard against looting. The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (TWC) issued an initial warning for Chile, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia and Panama. However, all warnings, watches and alerts were later lifted except for Chile and Peru. Tsunami watches – in which the danger of large waves is deemed to be less serious – had been in place for Costa Rica, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico and Honduras. “We have asked citizens to evacuate the entire coast,” Chilean home office minister Mahmud Aleuy said. Evacuations were also ordered in Peru, where waves 2m (6.5ft) above normal forced about 200 people to leave the seaside town of Boca del Rio near the Chilean border, police said.

 http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/site/?pageid=event_desc&edis_id=EQ-20140402-43216-CHL
[important]For more information on Tsunamis, Earthquakes and resources, see our information pages[/important]

.Tsunamis

Earthquakes

Nairobi Information Quick Links

9-22-13, 10 am CDT (-5 GMT)

“There are times when you feel useless. Those times when you realize that it could have been you, but it is not, and you realize that sometime, randomness is what makes the difference. The Westgate situation is one of those situations.” says, Anahi Ayala. Read more at link below.

Kenya Westgate Mall Attack: social media sources http://wp.me/pVqIs-g5

Relief Web updates

 

ReliefWeb

Situation Reports / 15 Feb 2014

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs – 09 Feb 2014
HIGHLIGHTS • The number of people from South Sudan seeking shelter in Sudan stands at some 24,700 as of 10 February, according to the Government of Sudan and humanitarian organisations. • The AU announced the resumption of negotiations between the Government of Sudan an d SPLM-N on the … Read more
European Commission Humanitarian Aid department – 13 Feb 2014
Messages clés – Suite à l’escalade de la violence intercommunautaire au début du mois de décembre 2013, le nombre de personnes déplacées internes (PDI s ) a dépassé les 714 000. Plus de 288 000 se trouvent dans la capitale, Bangui. 60% d’en tre elles sont des enfants. Plus de la moitié … Read more
European Commission Humanitarian Aid department – 13 Feb 2014
Key messages – Following the escalation of the inter-communal violence in the beginning of December 2013, the number of internally displaced people (IDPs) in the Central African Republic has increased to more than 714 000. Over 288 000 are reported in the capital Bangui. Sixty percent of them are … Read more
World Food Programme – 15 Feb 2014
South Sudan was affected by poor macro-economic performance even before the breakout of the current crisis, showing declining per capita GDP, shortage of foreign reserves, deflation, and a high spread between official and informal exchange rates. Despite the improved harvest, the country will still … Read more
UN High Commissioner for Refugees – 31 Jan 2014
UNHCR operational highlights – The awareness campaign on the multi-year resettlement operation of Congolese refugees took place from January 22 to 28 in several communes of Bujumbura. The aim was to give all the information on this operation and to raise awareness about responsible behavior from … Read more
UN High Commissioner for Refugees – 31 Jan 2014
Faits marquants dans les opérations de l’UNHCR – La campagne de sensibilisation sur l’opération pluri-annuelle de réinstallation des réfugiés congolais s’est déroulée du 22 au 28 janvier dans plusieurs communes de la Mairie de Bujumbura. Le but était de donner toute l’information … Read more
Famine Early Warning System Network – 15 Feb 2014
Maize is the main staple crop in Tanzania. Rice and beans are also very important, the latter constituting the main source of protein for most low- and middle- income households. Dar es Salaam is the main consumer market in the country. Arusha is another important market and is linked with Kenya in … Read more
Famine Early Warning System Network – 15 Feb 2014
Maize, sorghum, wheat, and groundnuts are the most important food commodities in South Sudan. Sorghum, maize, and groundnuts are the staple foods for the poor in most rural areas. Maize flour and wheat (as bread) are more important for middle-income and rich households in urban areas. Sorghum and … Read more
Famine Early Warning System Network – 15 Feb 2014
Maize grain and maize meal are the most important food commodities and indicators of food security in Zambia. All of the markets represented — with the exception of Kitwe — are in provincial centers and thus provide a geographic representation. Chipata and Choma are both areas of high maize … Read more
Famine Early Warning System Network – 15 Feb 2014
Maize is the most widely consumed cereal by the rural poor. Sorghum is generally one of the cheapest cereals. Teff is also very important throughout the country. The most important markets for teff are the large cities including Addis Ababa, Bahir Dar, Mekele, and Dire Dawa. Addis Abada is the … Read more
UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs – 13 Feb 2014
**HIGHLIGHTS** – Humanitarian aid delivered, and civilians evacuated from the besieged Old City of Homs – Estimated hundreds of thousands displaced from eastern Aleppo City and rural areas. – Nine days of access to Yarmouk camp enables distribution of food, medicines and medical attention to … Read more
US Agency for International Development – 14 Feb 2014
**HIGHLIGHTS** – Approximately 707,400 people remain internally displaced in South Sudan as a result of hostilities that began on December 15. – U.N. Under-Secretary-General and Emergency Relief Coordinator Valerie Amos declared the current crisis in South Sudan a Level Three Emergency on February … Read more

What is it like fasting in the heatwave?

4:00pm Thursday 18th July 2013 in NewsBy Asian Image reporter

What is it like fasting in the heatwave?
What is it like fasting in the heatwave?

It has been hottest summer since 2006 but how are Muslims coping with the heat?.

Ramadan is now over a week old but things don’t seem to have got any easier.

Shabana, 27, a teacher says she struggled to get through the first two days, “It was really difficult at first. The first two days my friends found it really hard and I couldn’t concentrate at all in the afternoon!

“The weekend was worst than during the weekday. At least during the weekday you can work and stay occupied.

continue reading here

info4 Drought Quick links

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Drought
In general, drought is defined as an extended period – a season, a year, or several years – of deficient rainfall relative to the statistical multi-year average for a region. However, dozens of more specific drought definitions are used around the world that are defined according to the lack of rain over various time periods, or measured impacts such as reservoir levels or crop losses. Because of the various ways drought is measured, an objective drought definition has yet to be produced upon which everyone can agree[1].
Source: UNISDR
Characteristics
Drought can be defined according to meteorological, hydrological, and agricultural criteria[2].
– Meteorological.
Drought is usually based on long-term precipitation departures from normal, but there is no consensus regarding the threshold of the deficit or the minimum duration of the lack of precipitation that make a dry spell an official drought.
– Hydrological
Drought refers to deficiencies in surface and subsurface water supplies. It is measured as stream flow, and as lake, reservoir, and ground water levels.
– Agricultural
Drought occurs when there is insufficient soil moisture to meet the needs of a particular crop at a particular time. A deficit of rainfall over cropped areas during critical periods of the growth cycle can result in destroyed or underdeveloped crops with greatly depleted yields. Agricultural drought is typically evident after meteorological drought but before a hydrological drought.
Impacts/damages
Impacts are commonly referred to as direct or indirect. Reduced crop, rangeland, and forest productivity; increased fire hazard; reduced water levels; increased livestock and wildlife mortality rates; and damage to wildlife and fish habitat are a few examples of direct impacts. The consequences of these impacts illustrate indirect impacts. For example, a reduction in crop, rangeland, and forest productivity may result in reduced income for farmers and agribusiness, increased prices for food and timber, unemployment, reduced tax revenues because of reduced expenditures, increased crime, foreclosures on bank loans to farmers and businesses, migration, and disaster relief programs. Direct or primary impacts are usually biophysical. Conceptually speaking, the more removed the impact from the cause, the more complex the link to the cause. In fact, the web of impacts becomes so diffuse that it is very difficult to come up with financial estimates of damages. The impacts of drought can be categorized as economic, environmental, or social.
Many economic impacts occur in agriculture and related sectors, including forestry and fisheries, because of the reliance of these sectors on surface and subsurface water supplies. In addition to obvious losses in yields in crop and livestock production, drought is associated with increases in insect infestations, plant disease, and wind erosion. Droughts also bring increased problems with insects and diseases to forests and reduce growth. The incidence of forest and range fires increases substantially during extended droughts, which in turn places both human and wildlife populations at higher levels of risk[3].
See also an example of the effects of drought on the aquatic ecosystem in Australia and Colorado.
Emergency Action
In order to assess risk and respond to drought, a water supplier may wish to establish a local drought management team. Be sure to include people from all the relevant local water user groups on the team[4] (see more details on the link). A team may:
  • gather all the available drought information for your community,
  • identify information gaps,
  • target water management needs,
  • implement water conservation strategies,
  • provide support to local government in managing community water supplies, and
  • communicate with the public.
See also the action on responding to drought in pastoral areas of Ethiopia and the North Carolina emergency response plan.
Mitigation
The mitigation action identifies both the long and short term activities and actions that can be implemented to prevent and mitigate drought impacts. Such activities and actions are essential in the development of specific drought planning and response efforts. The operational component includes six aspects that need continuous feedback between them[5]:
  • Preparedness, early warning, monitoring systems.
  • Establishing priorities of water use.
  • Defining the conditions and the thresholds to declare drought levels.
  • Establishing the management objectives in each drought level.
  • Defining the actions.
  • Implementation of actions.
Monitoring and preparedness planning is the first essential step for moving from crisis to risk management in response to drought, and can be viewed as permanent measures to cope with drought events. The management actions related to agriculture and water supply systems are presented with a common conceptual framework based on the use of drought indices for evaluating the levels of drought risk (pre-alert, alert, and emergency), that allow linkages to be established between science (risk analysis) and policy (operational component).
See also drought mitigation policy in South Africa in Water Page and drought mitigation strategy for Bundelkhand region of Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh in India.
Further information
Several actions related to drought management plans:
1.    Drought contingency planning for pastoral livelihoods. (click here)
2.    Drought Contingency and Emergency Water Management Plan in Texas. (click here)
3.    Drought management guidelines in Mediterranean countries. (click here)
4.    Information about satellite observation and rainfall forecast to provide earlier warning of African drought by USGS.
 
 
above info4mation is from our friends at the UN

 

DROUGHT
USGS Water Use
UNL Drought Monitor
UNL Drought Monitor Current Conditions
National Drought Mitigation Center
USDA Drought Reports
USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service
NOAA’s Drought Info

 

[important]PLEASE PUT ANY BROKEN LINKS IN THE COMMENTS BOX. THANK YOU![/important]

Africa Health and Disease Reporting

Health and Diseases real-time reports from Africa is Citizens Initiative developed in 2013, based on Ushahidi-Crowdmap to monitor  the health situation in Africa: outbreaks, health system improvements, positive events. It leverages on Technology to coordinate incidences and Actions.

Through its reporting platform, Health&Diseases enables unprecedented collaboration between the African citizenry, doctors, health workers, the civil society, community based organizations, digital humanitarians and tourists to monitor the health situation in near real-time. Health&Diseases went live on March 15,2013.

Our workflow you can see here: http://hdcommunity.wordpress.com/2013/04/06/workflow/
If you want join to our team – please contact us via email.
If you want to become a volunteer – please fill out this form. [ http://hdcommunity.wordpress.com/2013/04/04/become-a-volunteer/ ]

http://africamed.crowdmap.com – community crowdsource map being done globally and virtually or by:
e-mail: africacrowdmap@gmail.com
by sending a tweet with the hashtag: #africamed

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